Who should I vote for? (in Off-topic)


AdminTitan [The Sky Forge] September 25 2008 9:47 PM EDT

I can't decide who I support for President. I am very well informed about the two, but I still cannot make my decision. I am very morally conservative and base most of my morals on the bible, but I am economically liberal. Please help me with this decision.

PS: Do not turn this into an argument, or a religion bashing please.

Xiaz on Hiatus September 25 2008 9:52 PM EDT

How long has these election campaigns been going? It's ridiculously long, and I don't know who stands for what.

But IMO moral > economics, always. I'd never sell my soul.

QBBast [Hidden Agenda] September 25 2008 9:52 PM EDT


Can we turn it into a referendum on stodgy old white guys?

Blarg September 25 2008 9:55 PM EDT

Green party?

Obscurans September 25 2008 9:56 PM EDT

The real income (adjusted for inflation) under democratic presidents has grown year-per-year more than under republican presidents - in every income bracket, including the top, where those tax cuts go. Unemployment has also been consistently lower under democrats. Even with the supposed regulatory weight from the "socialist" Ds.

http://www.washingtonmonthly.com/archives/individual/2005_05/006282.php

Which is mighty funny.

AdminQBnovice [Cult of the Valaraukar] September 25 2008 10:04 PM EDT

I guess the simplest way to chose would be to look at the current economic situation and decide if you want more of the same.

In reality, I think the choice should be based on our standing in the world. The possibility of world wide economic decline leaves me wishing we had the image we once held in the worlds eyes. I don't want to be seen as the ugly fear mongering bully when it comes time to band together as a species and fight to survive.

Competence could also been seen as a factor, however in this day of picture perfect candidates without much substance, I guess that's mostly about who they hire to do the thinking.

I don't think personal morality should really be much of a factor, but that's likely because I lean libertarian more often than not. The government isn't there to tell us what to do with our lives.

Godpanda September 25 2008 10:14 PM EDT

Vote Goat 08

Relic September 25 2008 10:18 PM EDT

I would have to agree with novice to some degree. Less government involvement in my life the better. Government is there to provide certain rights and liberties and to make and enforce laws.

I would suggest choosing the candidate the you feel best represents your view of government and what direct involvement that government has in your life.

The propaganda issues are just that propaganda. What the stance of a candidate is on abortion has nothing to do with nothing imo, it is extremely unlikely that roe vs. wade will be overturned or changed anytime soon.

Morality is so subjective in the world today, especially in politics. The question I ask myself regarding the candidates is "Would this person make a good parent?"

The reason I ask myself that is because good parents are selfless, they put the needs of their children (responsibilities) above their own (desires). They are empathetic, humble, firm, loving, respectful and praiseworthy. If they can run a household and gain the respect of a spouse and their children, then they in turn can gain that same respect in regard to being the "Father" or "Mother" of the nation as the case may be.

3D September 25 2008 10:22 PM EDT

I don't think personal morality should really be much of a factor, but that's likely because I lean libertarian more often than not. The government isn't there to tell us what to do with our lives.

I'm no expert in politics, but doesn't preferring the government to "not tell us what to do" more of a Republican stance?

Admindudemus [jabberwocky] September 25 2008 10:59 PM EDT

i think it is probably a bad choice to look to politicians for moral guidance and support. the separation of church and state was one of the wisest decisions ever made in my opinion and it likely should work both ways. the political leaders shouldn't interfere with churches and pastors shouldn't give advice on politics.

in my mind it is kinda like asking your car mechanic for medical advice.

Admindudemus [jabberwocky] September 25 2008 11:00 PM EDT

i guess my advice then would be vote for your wallet and then increase your tithing. ; )

Ernest-Scribbler September 25 2008 11:05 PM EDT

I feel that this recent ploy of McCains to "suspend" his campaign is the first sign of interest he has shown in the economy. If you are not worried about money right now, start. It is going to get very bleak, very quick. Whether or not Obama can do anything about it i am not sure, but he will try. McCain will do as little as possible. These are my opinions, feel free to comment on this but bare in mind i understand that i can be wrong.

Gunny Pew Pew [Red Permanent Assurance] September 25 2008 11:08 PM EDT

+5 GW

Write in Ron Paul. You don't have to pick between three evils. Big ups for Cthulhu.

[P]Mitt September 25 2008 11:26 PM EDT

See, what I don't get is why people equate Republicans with Religious and Democrats as not. Every single president has been some form of Protestant (with the exception of JFK) and both candidates are religious.

Personally, as someone who has grown up with computers (I am 18), I would prefer to not vote for someone who has very little experience with computers and the internet. The Internet has changed everything: Politics, Economics, Everything... And it will continue to do so, whether or not we admit it. Which is why I'm casting my first vote in my life for Obama.

Goodfish September 25 2008 11:39 PM EDT

Don't vote. Your vote means quite literally nothing anyways.

If you feel voting is necessary, then I suggest you vote for Obama. Economically, our country is in a much more dangerous situation than we are "morally", and (hopefully) Obama's economic policy jives with your personal economic beliefs also.

I'm not a politics buff, though. I'm not voting, that's for damn sure!

3D September 25 2008 11:51 PM EDT

For all you who say our economy is in turmoil, and it is, I hope you aren't USD spenders either ^.^ Just thought I should throw that out there.

Obscurans September 26 2008 12:00 AM EDT

The fact is that more than half americans answer "yes" to "would you not vote for an otherwise qualified president solely because (s)he was atheist?" - nobody dares report no religious affiliation since it's political suicide. And less americans answer "yes" to "... because (s)he was gay?".

Obscurans September 26 2008 12:01 AM EDT

http://www.outsidethebeltway.com/archives/black_president_more_likely_than_mormon_or_atheist

link disappeared on me

Unappreciated Misnomer September 26 2008 12:04 AM EDT

just vote for the lesser of the 2 evils, we are damned if we do and damned if we dont.

InebriatedArsonist September 26 2008 12:53 AM EDT

AG Titan

-If you haven't yet done so, you could try any of the numerous who's-my-candidate tests on the net, or, failing that, try something like the Political Compass test and compare your result to the candidates.

Bastycakes

Can we turn it into a referendum on stodgy old white guys?

-By the time I was allowed to vote in the primary, a "stodgy old white guy" had already been chosen for me. Perhaps this is now a referendum on stodgy old guys vs. vacant young guys.

Blarg

Green party?

-Cynthia McKinney is nuts, and even Green Party members would do themselves a disservice by voting for her.

Novice

I guess the simplest way to chose would be to look at the current economic situation and decide if you want more of the same.

-If you vote for either Obama or McCain, you're probably going to get more deficit spending, more pork spending and generally a larger, more intrusive government. So, yeah, the major candidates are really more of the same.

3d

I'm no expert in politics, but doesn't preferring the government to "not tell us what to do" more of a Republican stance?

-Both major parties have libertarian-leaning elements, though I'd say the GOP contingent is somewhat more pronounced than their counterparts in the Democratic Party.

Dudemus

i think it is probably a bad choice to look to politicians for moral guidance and support. the separation of church and state was one of the wisest decisions ever made in my opinion and it likely should work both ways. the political leaders shouldn't interfere with churches and pastors shouldn't give advice on politics.

-I believe the prohibition on electioneering by religious groups as a condition of maintaining tax-exempt status is a direct violation of the First Amendment. Religious groups and leaders should be allowed to comment on political leaders, laws and such as they relate to religious beliefs without fear of a vindictive bureaucrat raising their taxes in reprisal.

Nonsensically

just vote for the lesser of the 2 evils, we are damned if we do and damned if we dont.

-Why vote for the lesser evil?

AdminTitan [The Sky Forge] September 26 2008 1:13 AM EDT

3d

I'm no expert in politics, but doesn't preferring the government to "not tell us what to do" more of a Republican stance?

Republicans like moral involvement in government more than democrats; however, they do not want economic involvement by the government.

Like others have suggested, I will probably vote based solely on the economic crisis, although I would like a pro life candidate who fit both.

3D September 26 2008 1:27 AM EDT

Oh ok, I think I get it. Thanks for the clarification.

Cube September 26 2008 1:37 AM EDT

"I am very morally conservative and base most of my morals on the bible, but I am economically liberal. Please help me with this decision."

Personally, I'm about the polar opposite, yet that still means I have a problem with both parties. If you can't choose one though, why should you have to? Everyone turns voting into a requirement, but if you dislike both parties you probably shouldn't be voting for one of them either. Don't Vote, or Vote third party, even if you won't win, you'll express your real opinion rather than boiling it down to a polarized choice. I think expressing your opinion is far more important/enriching than simply checking off one of two boxes.

Eurynome Bartleby [Bartleby's] September 26 2008 7:49 AM EDT

-Politically correct IMO sign-

I'm not from the States, and I can't honestly say I've done my job to learn more about your political system. However, as I have myself been unable to choose a candidate for the past three years (In Canada), I'd like to suggest something...

You can "void" your vote in the States right? I sure hope you can. If that's the case...PLEASE do not just stay home. If you can't make a decision, just vote for Mr. No One. Vote for freaking Cthulhu. Vote for nobody, but VOTE. Use your hands to reject the candidates if you wish, and cannot use them to support them. But lift the pencil, or push a button. Make use of your right to democracy, even if it's a rotten one and you think your voice means little. It's a matter of principles and dignity.

Sorry for not offering you any useful insight, but I think the above is VERY important, for you as well as any who stumble upon the thread. I repeat it to my friends and family every election year :P

Not voting is like saying "Look, I'm blindfolded and deaf, would you please guide me though this minefield?" to a total stranger.

Goodfish September 26 2008 3:45 PM EDT

I'll start voting when my vote starts making a difference. ;)

Colonel Custard [SeeD] September 26 2008 3:51 PM EDT

Ron Paul.

Eliteofdelete [Battle Royale] September 26 2008 3:52 PM EDT

/me agrees with Custard

baslisks September 26 2008 3:53 PM EDT

Think about the country as a company. You are the customer. Who would you want running the company to best suit your wants?

Unappreciated Misnomer September 26 2008 4:04 PM EDT

the lesser of 2 evils; if they promise less, they break less promises.

i really cant get into this. i would just argue, i am already talking to myself. :D

Sickone September 26 2008 4:34 PM EDT

Lord Bob September 26 2008 4:39 PM EDT

"I am very morally conservative and base most of my morals on the bible, but I am economically liberal."

The thing that you need to remember is that not everyone shares your own sense of what you consider "moral," and it is very IMMORAL to force your beliefs on those who don't share them. You shouldn't be trying to legislate your opinions on so called "moral issues" into the law. Nobody is going to take your beliefs away, and you can still live the way you want. We only ask that you show the rest of us the same courtesy.

A good economy, on the other hand, is something that ALL of us can agree we want, and is something that benefits us all.

Also, tax cuts for the ultra wealthy while the poor are denied health care certainly isn't "moral," especially if you go by the Bible. Ask yourself, would Jesus support these things?

Therefore, if you want to be on the side of real morality, and Christian morality, and economic prosperity, vote Obama.

Lord Bob September 26 2008 4:41 PM EDT

"Your vote means quite literally nothing anyways. "

Of course it does Borgin. It just counts for the exact same amount as everyone else's. If that's too small for you, then go ahead and stay home. But don't act like it counts for nothing.

QBsutekh137 September 26 2008 5:15 PM EDT

And if you REALLY want to make a difference, vote AND push for vote reform to make your vote count for me. Our votes should really matter, and not be "thrown away" for example, if we choose to vote for a Libertarian candidate. Things like run-off voting are very simple, and push more power to the people. Sadly, neither the Democrats nor Republicans are willing to do anything that undermines their power in a two-party system.

If you are interested, Slashdot has an article on an analysis that shows some elections have been as close as a few hundred votes, depending on the numbers crunched and where you would be living (Electoral College being what it is). So saying your vote doesn't matter is pretty much mathematically incorrect as well as civically bankrupt.

Lord Bob September 26 2008 5:27 PM EDT

I also support run-off voting, but it will be a cold day in Hades before we see it in this country.

AdminG Beee September 26 2008 5:45 PM EDT

As a Brit looking from the outside in I can't believe how lacking in substance this whole election campaign has been. Never has the phrase Personality politics been more applicable.

I'd vote for the one that can do the best Frank Sinatra impression of My Way.
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