Texas BOE Continues Trolling (in Links)


AdminQBVerifex [Serenity In Chaos] March 12 2010 7:28 PM EST

http://scienceblogs.com/dispatches/2010/03/texas_boe_removes_jefferson_fr.php"

Here's the amendment Dunbar changed: "explain the impact of Enlightenment ideas from John Locke, Thomas Hobbes, Voltaire, Charles de Montesquieu, Jean Jacques Rousseau, and Thomas Jefferson on political revolutions from 1750 to the present." Here's Dunbar's replacement standard, which passed: "explain the impact of the writings of John Locke, Thomas Hobbes, Voltaire, Charles de Montesquieu, Jean Jacques Rousseau, Thomas Aquinas, John Calvin and Sir William Blackstone." Not only does Dunbar's amendment completely change the thrust of the standard. It also appalling drops one of the most influential political philosophers in American history -- Thomas Jefferson.

AdminQBVerifex [Serenity In Chaos] March 12 2010 7:31 PM EST

Greatest hits from the article:
Board member Barbara Cargill wants to insert a discussion of the right to bear arms in a standard that focuses on First Amendment rights and the expression of various points of view. This is absurd. If they want students to study the right to bear arms, at least try to find an appropriate place in the standards for it. This is yet another example of politicians destroying the coherence of a curriculum document for no reason other than promoting ideological pet causes. Republican board member Bob Craig of Lubbock is suggesting a better place for such a standard. But the amendment passes anyway. The board's far-right faction is simply impervious to logic.

AdminQBVerifex [Serenity In Chaos] March 12 2010 7:32 PM EST

And the final bit:
Board member Mavis Knight offers the following amendment: "examine the reasons the Founding Fathers protected religious freedom in America by barring government from promoting or disfavoring any particular religion over all others." Knight points out that students should understand that the Founders believed religious freedom was so important that they insisted on separation of church and state.

Board member Cynthia Dunbar argues that the Founders didn't intend for separation of church and state in America. And she's off on a long lecture about why the Founders intended to promote religion. She calls this amendment "not historically accurate."

Zenai March 12 2010 7:34 PM EST

/me facepalms

AdminTitan March 12 2010 7:54 PM EST

In their favor, TJ really did have common beliefs with many of those listed before, and his ideas were far less innovative that I would say Madison's or Hamilton's. But, is this their true reason... well it is Texas.

DERPA [Red Permanent Assurance] March 12 2010 8:11 PM EST

This thread is closed to new posts. However, you are welcome to reference it from a new thread; link this with the html <a href="/bboard/q-and-a-fetch-msg.tcl?msg_id=00318I">Texas BOE Continues Trolling</a>